Pantsless Progressive

ilyagerner:

Why Liberals and Progressives Should Care About The Government’s Raisin Cartel
This morning, I posted a link to a Washington Post article about Marvin Horne, a California grape farmer who is fighting the federal government’s efforts to expropriate a portion of his crop.
Understandably, a majority of responses to that post came from libertarian-ish tumblrs. 
I suspect that’s ~80% a result of hipsterlibertarian’s reblogging the post and ~20% a consequence of liberals not giving a damn about federal marketing orders when there are so many other pressing issues to confront. Which is too bad.
There are a lot of reasons why high liberals — not just liberaltarians or bleeding heart libertarians or what have you — should care about America’s neo-feudal agriculture policy:
1. Policy: It’s not about big vs. small government, it’s about economic privilege
As liberals, our battle isn’t to create a bigger or more activist government, but to combat entrenched privilege. Oftentimes, it takes government action to ameliorate the injustices that have been created by the free market, the genetic lottery, and other forces beyond any one individual’s control. In these cases, we advocate for government programs that redistribute resources from the relatively privileged to the less fortunate.
But there are plenty of instances when the government itself has created a class of privileged insiders. 
In this case, the government has decreed that farmers must reserve a certain portion of their crop, which they may not sell on the open market. The percentage of the crop that must be reserved each year is established by the USDA, based on the recommendations of a committee of industry representatives, consisting of 46 members of industry and one member of the public. For the portion of the crop that’s been reserved, farmers are either not compensated at all or are paid below the cost of production, to say nothing of market value.
The winners in this arrangement are large raisin producers, especially the 46 members of the committee, who can manipulate the price of raisins. They’re happy to give up a part of their crop — as long as they can force others to do the same — in exchange for a higher price for their produce.
The losers? Small farmers who can’t afford to give up 40% of their crop for free. And consumers who are paying more for raisins than they could be. The current policy places the weight of the government on the side of the big industry players against small-time producers and consumers. Liberals should be against that.
It’s true, freeing the raisins does not a just society make. But there are plenty of other cases where the same logic of government-entrenched privilege prevails. 
Commodity crop subsidies flow to wealthy landowners. Occupational licensing rules that prevent dental hygienists from working independently enrich already-wealthy dentists at the expense of hygienists and patients. Ex-felons are kept in poverty by regulations forbidding them from hundreds of occupations that have little to do with the crimes they committed. These are economic injustices as much as those created by an unbridled market. They should be liberal concerns too.
2. Politics: Dumb laws poison the liberal project
Like Barney Frank and Barack Obama say, government “is simply the name we give to the things we choose to do together.” But if that thing happens to be taking a bunch of raisins from a farmer, not compensating him, and then letting those raisins molder in some California warehouse, normal people are going to be justly skeptical of the next great liberal project to improve their standard of living. 
3. Legal Strategy: Hard cases make bad law
Advocates of expansive federal power, as many liberals are, should not want cases akin to the raisin debacle to appear anywhere near the current Supreme Court.
Much of the social welfare state relies on an expansive reading of the Constitution’s Commerce Clause. And for better or worse, that expansive reading was set by precedents in ag-related cases, which gave the federal government vast powers over anything related to interstate commerce.
The Wickard v. Filburns of the world are the legal framework on which much of the modern state rests, but if we keep giving Scalia and company sympathetic claimants, eventually five justices are going to narrow the construction of the Commerce Clause to the point where federal programs almost universally-admired by liberals become threatened.
Better to repeal federal market orders legislatively than risk taking a huge constitutional hit somewhere down the line.
Free-market raisins are not going to become a center-left cause célèbre, but whether for reasons of ideology, law, or political posturing, liberals should take notice.

ilyagerner:

Why Liberals and Progressives Should Care About The Government’s Raisin Cartel

This morning, I posted a link to a Washington Post article about Marvin Horne, a California grape farmer who is fighting the federal government’s efforts to expropriate a portion of his crop.

Understandably, a majority of responses to that post came from libertarian-ish tumblrs.

I suspect that’s ~80% a result of hipsterlibertarian’s reblogging the post and ~20% a consequence of liberals not giving a damn about federal marketing orders when there are so many other pressing issues to confront. Which is too bad.

There are a lot of reasons why high liberals — not just liberaltarians or bleeding heart libertarians or what have you — should care about America’s neo-feudal agriculture policy:

1. Policy: It’s not about big vs. small government, it’s about economic privilege

As liberals, our battle isn’t to create a bigger or more activist government, but to combat entrenched privilege. Oftentimes, it takes government action to ameliorate the injustices that have been created by the free market, the genetic lottery, and other forces beyond any one individual’s control. In these cases, we advocate for government programs that redistribute resources from the relatively privileged to the less fortunate.

But there are plenty of instances when the government itself has created a class of privileged insiders.

In this case, the government has decreed that farmers must reserve a certain portion of their crop, which they may not sell on the open market. The percentage of the crop that must be reserved each year is established by the USDA, based on the recommendations of a committee of industry representatives, consisting of 46 members of industry and one member of the public. For the portion of the crop that’s been reserved, farmers are either not compensated at all or are paid below the cost of production, to say nothing of market value.

The winners in this arrangement are large raisin producers, especially the 46 members of the committee, who can manipulate the price of raisins. They’re happy to give up a part of their crop — as long as they can force others to do the same — in exchange for a higher price for their produce.

The losers? Small farmers who can’t afford to give up 40% of their crop for free. And consumers who are paying more for raisins than they could be. The current policy places the weight of the government on the side of the big industry players against small-time producers and consumers. Liberals should be against that.

It’s true, freeing the raisins does not a just society make. But there are plenty of other cases where the same logic of government-entrenched privilege prevails.

Commodity crop subsidies flow to wealthy landowners. Occupational licensing rules that prevent dental hygienists from working independently enrich already-wealthy dentists at the expense of hygienists and patients. Ex-felons are kept in poverty by regulations forbidding them from hundreds of occupations that have little to do with the crimes they committed. These are economic injustices as much as those created by an unbridled market. They should be liberal concerns too.

2. Politics: Dumb laws poison the liberal project

Like Barney Frank and Barack Obama say, government “is simply the name we give to the things we choose to do together.” But if that thing happens to be taking a bunch of raisins from a farmer, not compensating him, and then letting those raisins molder in some California warehouse, normal people are going to be justly skeptical of the next great liberal project to improve their standard of living. 

3. Legal Strategy: Hard cases make bad law

Advocates of expansive federal power, as many liberals are, should not want cases akin to the raisin debacle to appear anywhere near the current Supreme Court.

Much of the social welfare state relies on an expansive reading of the Constitution’s Commerce Clause. And for better or worse, that expansive reading was set by precedents in ag-related cases, which gave the federal government vast powers over anything related to interstate commerce.

The Wickard v. Filburns of the world are the legal framework on which much of the modern state rests, but if we keep giving Scalia and company sympathetic claimants, eventually five justices are going to narrow the construction of the Commerce Clause to the point where federal programs almost universally-admired by liberals become threatened.

Better to repeal federal market orders legislatively than risk taking a huge constitutional hit somewhere down the line.

Free-market raisins are not going to become a center-left cause célèbre, but whether for reasons of ideology, law, or political posturing, liberals should take notice.

Bad News for the Haters Dept.: You realize that all those obnoxious 16-year-olds you see everywhere, texting their friends who are standing next to them, will be able to vote in the 2016 elections. Do you think you will be able to sell them on your anti-gay/anti-woman/anti-brown/black platform? Do you think they want to end up like you? I bet they don’t. Gov. Bobby Jindal said that you all have to stop being the stupid party. I don’t think you can do it. How did equality become political? Because you can’t handle science, change or the truth. America is on the move, you are not.

Henry Rollins (via matthewclan)

Reblogged from Matt C's Tumblelog

I decided to break the law to provide a necessary medical service because women were dying at the hands of butchers and incompetent quacks, and there was no one there to help them. The law was barbarous, cruel and unjust. I had been in a concentration camp, and I knew what suffering was. If I can ease suffering, I feel perfectly justified in doing so.

Dr. Henry Morgentaler, a Canadian doctor who was arrested four times for performing abortions, but whose arrests eventually led to the 1988 Canadian Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion in the country. He died this week at the age of 90. Good obit in the NY Times.

(via ilyagerner)

ccindecision:

Goodbye, Michele Bachmann. Thanks for the memories:

1. Like the time she shared her hometown pride in growing up in the same county as serial killer John Wayne Gacy.
2. The way she doth display her knowledge of Shakespeare: “‘Thou protesteth too much,” quoth Bachmann.
3. The time she learned all about HPV vaccines from a random lady.
4. “I haven’t had a gaffe or something that I’ve done that has caused me to fall in the polls.”
5. The time she called the tax code a “weapon of mass destruction“ and we finally learned why we invaded Iraq (Saddam’s capital gains tax, duh).
6. That speech where she claimed the Revolutionary War started in New Hampshire. 
7. When she wished Elvis a happy birthday on the anniversary of his death.
8. “Now with the president, he put us in Libya. He is now putting us in Africa.”
9. “I’m a lovable little fuzz ball! I have no idea what [liberals] would have to fear.”
10. That time she wasn’t afraid to blame God for hurricanes.
11. The quote that nearly caused PolitiFact to explode, ”After the debate that we had last week, PolitiFact came out and said that everything I said was true.”
12. The way she loved synonyms as much as she hated the environment: ”The big thing we are working on now is the global warming hoax. It’s all voodoo, nonsense, hokum, a hoax.”
13. ”I find it interesting that it was back in the 1970s that the swine flu broke out then under another Democrat president, Jimmy Carter. And I’m not blaming this on President Obama, I just think it’s an interesting coincidence.”
14. That time she wouldn’t look directly at the CNN camera, probably because she thought the liberal media would steal her soul.
15. The way she spoke like a Game of Thrones character: “What we have to do today is make a covenant, to slit our wrists, be blood brothers on this thing. This will not pass. We will do whatever it takes to make sure this doesn’t pass.”

If she did all this while holding office, imagine what she’ll be able to accomplish with the free time she’s about to have.
Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images News/Getty Images

ccindecision:

Goodbye, Michele Bachmann. Thanks for the memories:

1. Like the time she shared her hometown pride in growing up in the same county as serial killer John Wayne Gacy.

2. The way she doth display her knowledge of Shakespeare: “‘Thou protesteth too much,” quoth Bachmann.

3. The time she learned all about HPV vaccines from a random lady.

4. “I haven’t had a gaffe or something that I’ve done that has caused me to fall in the polls.”

5. The time she called the tax code a “weapon of mass destruction“ and we finally learned why we invaded Iraq (Saddam’s capital gains tax, duh).

6. That speech where she claimed the Revolutionary War started in New Hampshire. 

7. When she wished Elvis a happy birthday on the anniversary of his death.

8. “Now with the president, he put us in Libya. He is now putting us in Africa.”

9. “I’m a lovable little fuzz ball! I have no idea what [liberals] would have to fear.”

10. That time she wasn’t afraid to blame God for hurricanes.

11. The quote that nearly caused PolitiFact to explode, ”After the debate that we had last week, PolitiFact came out and said that everything I said was true.”

12. The way she loved synonyms as much as she hated the environment: ”The big thing we are working on now is the global warming hoax. It’s all voodoo, nonsense, hokum, a hoax.”

13. ”I find it interesting that it was back in the 1970s that the swine flu broke out then under another Democrat president, Jimmy Carter. And I’m not blaming this on President Obama, I just think it’s an interesting coincidence.”

14. That time she wouldn’t look directly at the CNN camera, probably because she thought the liberal media would steal her soul.

15. The way she spoke like a Game of Thrones character: “What we have to do today is make a covenant, to slit our wrists, be blood brothers on this thing. This will not pass. We will do whatever it takes to make sure this doesn’t pass.”

If she did all this while holding office, imagine what she’ll be able to accomplish with the free time she’s about to have.

Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images News/Getty Images

Via Ezra Klein, today is a good day to remember that the U.S. is the only advanced country that doesn’t guarantee paid vacation days and paid holidays. About a quarter of U.S. workers don’t receive paid time off. 
Not surprisingly, low-income employees and part-time employees are less likely to get paid time off, with less than half of low-income workers receiving paid vacation days. And let’s not forget that approximately 7.26 million Americans work more than one job. [Wonkblog]

Via Ezra Klein, today is a good day to remember that the U.S. is the only advanced country that doesn’t guarantee paid vacation days and paid holidays. About a quarter of U.S. workers don’t receive paid time off. 

Not surprisingly, low-income employees and part-time employees are less likely to get paid time off, with less than half of low-income workers receiving paid vacation days. And let’s not forget that approximately 7.26 million Americans work more than one job. [Wonkblog]